Science

Advance Placement Environmental Science

AP Environmental Science (APES) is a year-long course that reflects the content and rigor of a university (100 level) course in environment science. The class is geared toward preparation for the AP exam in the spring. Students will learn the major environmental issues facing the planet and focus on their causes and affects both locally and globally. Students will consider existing solutions to these problems and also develop their own ideas for mitigation and remediation strategies. Topics include Earth science concepts, ecology, populations, renewable and non-renewable energy, land and water resources, food production, chemical pollution, and climate change. Students will be expected to write and communicate at a high level both in the class and on the AP exam and therefore strong English language skills are necessary. You must have taken Biology and Chemistry in order to enroll in this course. This course is part of the STEM Diploma Program.

Biology

In this year-long course, students are introduced to the foundational concepts needed to be successful in higher level biology courses. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary acquisition, reading, writing, and speaking. Therefore, moderate English language skills are necessary. The goal of this emphasis on language is for students to learn to speak the language of biological science. Most labs and projects require that students present results and information to their peers and are able to explain and justify their ideas both verbally and in writing. The biology topics covered include biological molecules, cell form and function and the cell cycle, protein synthesis and genetics, evolution, reproduction, and development. In learning the vocabulary and vernacular in these areas, students will demonstrate their knowledge through projects and experiments of their own design. There are no prerequisites to take this course. This course is part of the STEM Diploma Program.

Chemistry

In this year-long course, students learn the foundational concepts needed to be successful in advanced chemistry classes. The curriculum focuses on modeling matter and how it changes. Students use visuals to explain physical and chemical changes while applying these concepts to stoichiometry and problem solving. Through inquiry based experiments and projects, students develop and demonstration problem solving skills. The course expands on the major themes of physical properties and change, chemical properties and change and energy flow and change. Through discussion and writing, students are required to express themselves in the language of chemistry to describe processes and predict changes. There are no prerequisites for this course. However, moderate English language skills are necessary.

Environmental Engineering (Sustainability)

This year-long course is part of the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) engineering rack where it is called Environmental Sustainability. Three broad topics are covered: water resources and availability, food production, and energy. In each topic students explore the problems and design solutions to maintain the sustainability of these resources. You must have taken Biology, Chemistry, and Algebra II in order to enroll in this course. This course is part of the STEM Diploma Program.

Exploring Technology of the Future I & II (each course is one semester)

Students develop an understanding of the progression and scope of technology through exploratory experiences. Through group and individual activities, students experience ways in which technology knowledge and process contribute to effective designs and solutions to technological problems. Unit titles include Introduction to Medical Technologies; Agriculture and Biotechnology Technologies; Energy-Power Technologies; Information and Communications Technologies; Transportation Technologies; Manufacturing Technologies; and Construction Technologies. There are no perquisites to take this course. This course is part of the STEM Diploma Program.

Flying Objects I (one semester)

Students will learn the scientific principles that allow aerospace vehicles to fly. They will build and fly hot air balloons, air-powered and solid-fuel rockets, balloon rocket cars, parachutes, kites, and remote control hovercraft. They will use NASA software to simulate aircraft flight and to design kites. They will gain a general knowledge of how human flight evolved throughout the world. Unit titles include History of Aviation; Buoyant Flight: Hot Air Balloons; Ballistic Flight: Rockets; Aerodynamic Flight: Airplanes; Other Aerospace Vehicles: Hovercraft; and Kites. You must have taken Algebra I or equivalent course including quadratic equations in order to enroll in this course.

Flying Objects II (one semester)

Students will learn about airports and navigation systems and will learn the basics of flying and navigating small aircraft. They will research the history of catapults, rockets, airships, and UAVs. They will design and build a catapult, a multi-stage rocket, remote-control blimps, and quadcopters. They will explore careers in aerospace and how the aerospace era has impacted the world. Unit titles include Airports and Navigation; Buoyant Flight: Blimps and Dirigibles; Catapults and Trebuchets; Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs); Ballistic Flight: Advanced Rocketry; and Careers in Aerospace. You must have taken Flying Objects I or Aerospace Engineering and be enrolled in or completed Algebra II or equivalent in order to enroll in this course.

Introduction to Engineering Design

At the end of this year-long course, students will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of the engineering design process and how engineers use it to solve problems; use measurement and statistics to analyze the creation of a product; calculate area, volume, and weight of three-dimensional solids; create sketches and solve problems using Computer Aided Drawing (CAD) software; work effectively in a team to solve a design challenge.  Unit titles include Design Process; Design Exercises; Reverse Engineering; and Open-Ended Design Problems. There are no prerequisites to take this course. This course is part of the STEM Diploma Program.

Physical Science I (fall semester only)

Physical Science I is the study of matter and changes in matter, and is an introduction to Chemistry. This semester long course is an introductory, hands-on, student center approach to science, with the student demonstrating understanding of basic science and chemistry principles. Unit titles include Introduction to Science; Matter; States of Matter; Elements and Periodic Table; Structure of Matter; and Chemical Reactions. There are no prerequisites to take this course. This course is part of the STEM Diploma Program.

Physical Science II (spring semester only)

Physical Science II is the study of kinematics and energy, and is an introduction to physics. This semester long course is an introductory, hands-on, student center approach to science, with the student demonstrating understanding of basic physics principles. Unit titles include Motion; Force; Work and Energy; Sound; Light; Electricity; and Magnetism. There are no prerequisites to take this course. This course is part of the STEM Diploma Program.

Project Lead the Way Aerospace Engineering

This one semester course will expose students to the world of aeronautics, flight, and engineering. Students will design and test components related to flight such as a glider, an airfoil, a rocket, and the composite materials used in construction. They will learn about orbital mechanics concepts and create models using industry-stand software. They will apply aerospace concepts in building wind turbines and a parachute. In addition, students will build and program a robot to explore a planet, map the terrain of the planet with a model satellite, and use the map to execute a mission using remote-control robot. Unit titles include Introduction to Aerospace; Aerospace Design; Space; and Alternative Aerospace Applications. You must have taken Algebra II, two years of high school science, and received a TOEFL score of 70 in order to enroll in this course. This course is part of the STEM Diploma Program.

Physics I (fall semester only)

Physics I emphasizes conceptual understanding of physics principles and concepts, through labs, hands-on activities, projects, and problem-solving exercises, and even though the course is mainly interested in the concepts behind certain physical phenomena, an algebra and geometry background is very helpful in expressing these concepts mathematically using simple equations. Unit titles include Scientific Skills; Kinematics; Forces and the Laws of Motion; Work; Energy; and Power. You must have taken or be enrolled in Algebra I and Geometry in order to enroll in this course. This course is part of the STEM Diploma Program.

Physics II (spring semester only)

Physics II emphasizes conceptual understanding of physics principles and concepts, through labs, hands-on activities, projects, and problem-solving exercises, and even though the course is mainly interested in the concepts behind certain physical phenomena, and algebra and geometry background is very helpful in expressing these concepts mathematically using simple equations. Unit titles include Momentum and Collisions; Rotational Motion and Gravity; Temperature and Heat; Waves and Sound; Light; Electricity; Circuits; and Magnetism. You must have taken or be enrolled in Algebra I and Geometry in order to enroll in this course. This course is part of the STEM Diploma Program.

Robotics I & II (each course is one semester)

Robotics I will focus on FIRST Tech Challenge
Robotics II will focus on FIRST Robotics

Students will acquire knowledge and skills in problem solving, teamwork, collaboration, and innovation while using a complex robotics platform to design, build, and program solutions that solve existing problems. Students acquire knowledge and skills in engineering problem solving and explore requirements for careers in engineering. Unit titles include History of Robotics; Mechanical Systems; Energy Transfer; Machine Automation; and Computer Control Systems. There are no perquisites to take this course. This course is part of the STEM Diploma Program.

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  • Saint Paul Preparatory School
    380 Jackson St
    Suite 100
    St Paul, MN 55101
    Local: pref 651-288-4606
    Fax: fax 651-288-4616
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